LOR
Lorenzo, 26 years. An italian living in London.
Hetero + Catholic.

Historian & idealist. When I'm not dreaming of impossible things you can find me writing articles concerning mythology and history.

"The response to questions asked are half truths at best.
My preference is for silence."

Et hic furor non deficit mihi iam toto anno. In me, Amor, tardus, non cogitat ullas artes nec meminit ire notas vias ut prius.

—(Propertius, Elegia I:I )
J’ai perdu mon Euridicerien n’égale mon malheur;Je succombe à ma doleur.Euridice, Euridice,réponds, quel supplice, réponds-moientends ma voix qui t’appelle…Vaine espérance

J’ai perdu mon Euridice
rien n’égale mon malheur;
Je succombe à ma doleur.
Euridice, Euridice,
réponds, quel supplice, réponds-moi
entends ma voix qui t’appelle…
Vaine espérance

thisblueboy:

John Collier (1850 - 1934), The Priestess of Delphi, 1891, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

thisblueboy:

John Collier (1850 - 1934), The Priestess of Delphi, 1891, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

Sæglópur
Sigur Rós
Takk...
117 plays
A futakuchi-onna (二口女, “two-mouthed woman”) is a yōkai in Japanese mythology: these demons are women with two mouths.The origin of a futakuchi-onna’s second mouth is often linked to how little a woman eats. In many stories, the soon-to-be futakuchi-onna is a wife of a miser and rarely eats.

A futakuchi-onna (二口女, “two-mouthed woman”) is a yōkai in Japanese mythology: these demons are women with two mouths.
The origin of a futakuchi-onna’s second mouth is often linked to how little a woman eats. In many stories, the soon-to-be futakuchi-onna is a wife of a miser and rarely eats.

“The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon" by Edward Poynter (1890)

The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon" by Edward Poynter (1890)

yuureibanashi:

STRIX or STRIGA Originally strzyga (ˈstʂɨɡa).Strzyga is a kind of demon, or maybe more of a vampire in slavic (especially Polish) folklore. It probably evolved from Roman Strix, which was a female demon with huge claws and was drinking human blood.In polish folklore, Strzygas were man born with two souls, two hearts and two sets of teeth or babies born with teeth already. It was belived that the second soul stayed on Earth even after death of the first one, but it had to hunt and drink blood so it could survive. Strzygas were belived to be able to transform into owls. They were drinking blood and eating their victims insides. Just as it is with vampires, one could kill Strzyga only with fire or by thrusting nails or pales into its body.

In roman mythology a strix (plural: striges or “veneficae”) was generally considered a witch transformed into a horrible nocturnal bird.Around 100 - 30 b.C. witches used to hold nocturnal rites on the Esquiline hill (Rome) since at the time there was a cemetery for peasants and poor people.The roman poet Horace in one of his satires describes the situation tells us that even the gods were disgusted of those rituals: the statues covered their eyes in order to avoid seeing the witches’ necromantic celebration.

yuureibanashi:

STRIX or STRIGA
Originally strzyga (ˈstʂɨɡa).
Strzyga is a kind of demon, or maybe more of a vampire in slavic (especially Polish) folklore. It probably evolved from Roman Strix, which was a female demon with huge claws and was drinking human blood.
In polish folklore, Strzygas were man born with two souls, two hearts and two sets of teeth or babies born with teeth already. It was belived that the second soul stayed on Earth even after death of the first one, but it had to hunt and drink blood so it could survive. Strzygas were belived to be able to transform into owls. They were drinking blood and eating their victims insides. Just as it is with vampires, one could kill Strzyga only with fire or by thrusting nails or pales into its body.


In roman mythology a strix (plural: striges orveneficae”) was generally considered a witch transformed into a horrible nocturnal bird.
Around 100 - 30 b.C. witches used to hold nocturnal rites on the Esquiline hill (Rome) since at the time there was a cemetery for peasants and poor people.
The roman poet Horace in one of his satires describes the situation tells us that even the gods were disgusted of those rituals: the statues covered their eyes in order to avoid seeing the witches’ necromantic celebration.